Ph.D. in Leadership in Academic Advising Student Handbook

Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs
Kansas State University

Ph.D. in Leadership in Academic Advising Student Handbook April 2020 – PDF document

Contents – Clicking on the Section heading will take you to that part of the document.

SECTION 1. INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW 

Kansas State University

College of Education

Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs

Ph.D. Program in Leadership in Academic Advising 

Degree 

Global Campus

Program Cohort 

Program Requirements

Academic Advising Professional Courses (9 credit hours)

Research Courses (15 credit hours) 

Dissertation Research (18 credit hours) 

Cohort and Enrollment in Courses 

Completing the PhD – Anticipated Timeframe

Doctoral Degree Checklist 

SECTION 2. DOCTORAL PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURE

Program of Study 

Major Professor

Supervisory Committee 

Preliminary Examination 

Candidacy and Continuous Enrollment 

Dissertation (Proposal and Final Defense

SECTION 3. INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES AND INFORMATION (selected) 

Assistantships 

Course Retakes 

Dismissal and Reinstatement 

Grades and Grade Requirements

Graduate Student Rights and Grievance Procedures

Inactive Status and Probation

Making Continual Progress

Student Conduct and the Honor System

Student Conduct 

Honor System and Honor Pledge .

Transfer of Credit 

SECTION 4. GENERAL INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

K-State Online Policies and Procedures 

Related Information – Student ID and Communication 

Wildcat ID

K-State eID 

Email and Webmail 

Related Information – Enrollment in Courses 

KSIS and Enrollment in Courses

Viewing Final Course Grades 

Library Services – Circulation Desk 

Textbooks

Technology in Courses

Related Information – Financial

Tuition and Fees

Paying Tuition and the K-State Cashier’s Office

Course Drop/Refunds 

Financial Aid

Scholarships

Travel Grants

SECTION 5. GLOBAL CAMPUS STUDENT SERVICES 

Academic Resources 

Career Resources

Center for Advocacy, Response, and Education 

Counseling Services for Distance Learners 

LGBT Resource Center 

Office of Student Life 

Non-Traditional and Veteran Student Services 

Powercat Financial

Student Access Center

SECTION 6. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

NACADA: The Global Community for Academic Advising

NACADA Center for Research at Kansas State University

APPENDIX A – Schedule of Courses 

APPENDIX B – Summer On-Campus Requirement 

APPENDIX C – Preliminary Examination Policy and Procedures 

Purpose of the Preliminary Examination 

Preliminary Exam Steps 

Preliminary Exam Instructions and Expectations

 

Graduate Student Handbook – PhD in Leadership in Academic Advising

SECTION 1. INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

Kansas State University

The mission of Kansas State University is to foster excellent teaching, research, and service that develop a highly skilled and educated citizenry necessary to advancing the well-being of Kansas, the nation, and the international community. The university embraces diversity, encourages engagement, and is committed to the discovery of knowledge, the education of undergraduate and graduate students, and improvement in the quality of life and standard of living of those we serve. Kansas State University is located in beautiful Manhattan, Kansas (see http://cityofmhk.com). K-State is consistently ranked in the top 10 for many prominent Princeton Review rankings, we boast some of the highest numbers of national scholars in a public university, and our experts are called on to solve problems around the world.

College of Education

The mission of the College of Education is: “Preparing educators to be knowledgeable, ethical, caring decision makers for a diverse and changing world.”

The College of Education produces more teachers than any of the other 24 teacher training programs in the state and is accredited by the Kansas State Department of Education and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, or NCATE. We have a diverse student body with more than 2,300 students; 15% of the student body is composed of multicultural students. There are approximately 1,000 graduate students, and of the College’s 1,300 undergraduates, 88% are from Kansas. Eleven percent of the student body is affiliated with the military, and 28% of undergraduate students are first-generation college attendees. The College boasts graduates living in all 105 Kansas counties, 50 states and 48 countries.

Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs

The mission of the Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs (SECSA) is to prepare knowledgeable ethical, caring decision makers who demonstrate inclusive perspectives toward the contexts of groups and institutions; student development and learning; teaching and guidance; inquiry and research methods; and research-enlightened clinical application, consultation, and practice.

The Department encompasses the following academic programs: Academic Advising (Graduate Certificate, M.S., Ph.D.); College Student Development (M.S.); Counselor Education and Supervision (Ph.D., CACREP accredited); School Counseling (M.S., CACREP accredited); Special Education (M.S., Ed.D.); and Student Affairs in Higher Education (Ph.D.).

Ph.D. Program in Leadership in Academic Advising

Degree

The Ph.D. in Leadership in Academic Advising is a subplan of the Ph.D. in Counseling and Student Development. The doctoral program prepares professionals for roles in leadership, research, and teaching focused on academic advising in higher education.

Global Campus

The Ph.D. in Leadership in Academic Advising is offered through the Kansas State University Global Campus (soon to be renamed “K-State Online”). The courses in the program are offered online and many of the courses will include a Zoom component that is synchronous. In addition, there will be a one-week session on campus for each of the first three summers. These activities are required of students who accept the offer of admission to the doctoral program; students will be expected to agree to their attendance and involvement in these activities.

Program Cohort

A cohort of students will be admitted to the program every other year (even-numbered years).

Program Requirements

Following are the degree requirements for the Ph.D. in Leadership in Academic Advising:

Core Courses (18 credit hours)

A designated core of 18 hours of graduate credit is required. These courses may be part of a master’s degree or must be completed in addition to the doctoral coursework. These courses include the following:

• EDCEP 812 History and Philosophy of Higher Education (3 credits)

• EDCEP 816 Research Methods (3 credits)

• EDCEP 835 Foundations of Academic Advising (3 credits)

• EDCEP 838 Student Development Theory (3 credits)

• EDCEP 863 Trends in Career Development (3 credits)

• EDCEP 851 Multicultural Aspects of Academic Advising (3 credits)

Or

EDCEP 830 Diversity in Higher Education (3 credits)

Professional Courses (18 credit hours)

• EDCEP 923 Higher Education Law (3 credits)

• EDCEP 925 Higher Education Finance (3 credits)

• EDCEP 926 Enrollment Management in Higher Education (3 credits)

• EDCEP 927 Higher Education Administration (3 credits)

• EDCEP 948 Advanced Student Development Theory (3 credits)

• EDLEA 828 Scholarly Orientation to Graduate Studies (3 credits)

Academic Advising Professional Courses (9 credit hours)

• EDCEP 930 Approaches to Academic Advising: Linking Theory, Research, and Practice (3 credits)

• EDCEP 932 Ethical Issues and Practice in Academic Advising (3 credits)

• EDCEP 937 Administration of Academic Advising (3 credits)

Research Courses (15 credit hours)

• EDLEA 838 Qualitative Research in Education (3 credits)

• EDLEA 988 Differentiated Research: Qualitative Methods (3 credits)

• EDCEP 817 Statistical Methods in Education (3 credits)

• EDCEP 917 Experimental Design in Educational Research (3 credits)

• EDCEP 934 Research in Academic Advising (3 credits)

Dissertation Research (18 credit hours)

Dissertation research hours include those used for completing the dissertation research. Moreover, students are typically enrolled in dissertation research hours when completing the preliminary examination. Candidates much successfully complete an examination of areas of the program of study.

• EDCEP 999 Research in Counseling and Educational Psychology (1-18 credits)

Cohort and Enrollment in Courses

Each cohort will take the courses in a planned sequence of six hours per semester (fall, spring, and summer – See Appendix A). Enrolling in the courses as a cohort and during the designated semesters is required of doctoral students admitted to the program. Depending on one’s academic record, the designated core courses may need to be completed in addition to the doctoral program courses.

Due to the nature of the Leadership in Academic Advising Doctoral Program cohort model, students enrolled in the program must agree to the synchronous and asynchronous schedule throughout the program. The program is designed to maximize learning and engagement, as well as to take advantage of the collaborative tools and interactive opportunities available to us. This includes the Canvas Learning Management System (Canvas), the Zoom meeting platform, and the Summer On-Campus Requirements.

Canvas

Canvas is a comprehensive web‐based learning management system that transforms the everyday classroom into interactive web sessions for the K-State community.

Canvas offers students simple yet powerful ways to view course lectures and materials, download files provided by the instructor, upload documents and assignments in various media formats, participate in chat rooms with a white board and message boards, be a part of a student group within their particular class, view their grades and progress reports, and communicate with their instructor via email.

Click HERE for an introduction to Canvas, including a tour of the system, helpful tips, and information on setting up your profile.

Mandatory Zoom Sessions

While learning is effectively conducted in an online, asynchronous environment, the cohort model for a doctoral program allows for an even deeper sense of community and scholarly growth through regular synchronous sessions. Sessions together on Zoom, an interactive video system, offers faculty and students with more instructional strategies available for discussions and presentations throughout the semester, further exploration of intended outcomes on assignments and projects, and additional professional development outside of the courses taken that semester.

Some courses in the doctoral program will require synchronous sessions on Zoom. Prior to each semester the specific information about attendance in synchronous sessions for each class will be provided.

Zoom will also be used in order to maximize the collaborative nature of the cohort. Cohort members will be required to reserve the first Tuesday of every month from 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm Central Time for cohort meetings and professional development activities. Again, prior to each semester, you will be provided the list of dates and activities for these sessions. Some dates and times may be adjusted due to holidays and other events. All cohort members will be consulted regarding the schedule.

Summer On-Campus Requirement

A one-week, on-campus session will be required of doctoral students for each of the first three summers. A condition of admission is that one agrees and commits to attend these sessions for three years. The dates for these sessions can be found in Appendix B. The sessions will be held at Kansas State University and include time in the NACADA Center for Research in Manhattan, KS.

The summer on-campus sessions will involve a variety of activities, including coursework in which students are enrolled for the summer, professional development activities, research and creative activities, meetings with advisors, and other activities related to doctoral work.

See Appendix B for more information about the Summer On-Campus Requirement, including logistical information about housing and travel.

Professional Development Opportunities

Opportunities for professional development will be conducted for the cohort throughout the program. Activities are planned that will support and complement graduate work. Opportunities will be provided for involvement in research activities. In addition to program activities, active involvement in NACADA: The Global Community for Academic Advising (NACADA) is recommended.

Completing the PhD – Anticipated Timeframe

The coursework for the program is intended to be completed over seven consecutive semesters with students enrolled in six hours per semester. If one were completing designated core courses concurrent with doctoral courses, these hours would be in addition to the program plan. Completing the preliminary examination and dissertation over four or five semesters would lead to completing the degree in about four years. Extra time may be necessary, depending on the nature of the dissertation topic, design, and research procedures.

Academic Year

Summer Term

Fall Term

Spring Term

2020-21

Coursework: Summer 2020

Coursework:

Fall 2020

Coursework:

Spring 2021

2021-22

Coursework: Summer 2021

Coursework:

Fall 2021

Coursework:

Spring 2022

2022-23

Coursework: Summer 2022

Preliminary Exam; begin Proposal:

Fall 2022

Proposal Meeting; IRB Protocol Submitted:

Spring 2023

2023-24

Diss. Research:

Summer 2023

Diss. Research:

Fall 2023

Defend Dissertation and Graduate: Spring 2024

2024-25

Extra time, if needed

Extra time, if needed

Extra time, if needed

Doctoral Degree Checklist

The doctoral degree checklist is provided to help students be successful in the final semester. Deadline dates are included in the checklist, and can be found at: http://www.k-state.edu/grad/etdr/submit/doctoral/

SECTION 2. DOCTORAL PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Program of Study

The Program of Study is a form that is to be completed by the end of the second semester of enrollment in the doctoral program. The form includes a listing of the courses included in the program and is to be signed by the major professor and the supervisory committee members.

See the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Program%20of%20Study

Major Professor

Upon admission to the program each student will be assigned a Major Professor who will serve as an initial contact and resource for entrance into the program. During the second semester each student will engage in a process to select the Major Professor who will serve as their facilitator through the rest of the program. The Major Professor directs the preliminary examination process and oversees the proposal for the dissertation as well as the dissertation. A Committee Member Change Form is required for any request to be reassigned to a different major professor (for example, if the research area more closely coincides with the scholarly work of another faculty member).

Supervisory Committee

The Supervisory Committee includes the major professor and at least three other members of the graduate faculty. One member of the Supervisory Committee must be a graduate faculty member from outside the Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs. The Supervisory Committee is involved in various activities related to the program, including ensuring University regulations are followed and program requirements are met.

See the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Supervisory%20Committee

Preliminary Examination

The preliminary examination provides an opportunity for the student to demonstrate their breadth and depth of knowledge pertaining to Leadership in Academic Advising. It also serves to demonstrate the student’s ability to draw connections between materials covered in various classes and apply the diverse themes and modes of inquiry that drive educational thought and practice.

Examination questions are individualized (developed by the major professor and other faculty members), requiring each student to relate the concepts and skills learned in the curriculum to his or her particular area of interest in academic advising. The area of interest may encompass the broad arena from which the student’s dissertation topic will be drawn, but work on the examination should not be confused with work on the dissertation. Elements of the preliminary examination will likely, however, be able to be used in the dissertation proposal, particularly in the review of related literature. See Appendix C for detailed information about the Preliminary Examination.

See the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Preliminary%20Examination

Candidacy and Continuous Enrollment

Upon passing the preliminary examination, a doctoral student is admitted to candidacy. Candidacy may last up to five years from the semester in which a candidate’s preliminary examination was passed. After being admitted to candidacy, a doctoral student must be continuously enrolled until the dissertation is completed. Continuous enrollment requires being enrolled in a minimum of one hour during the fall and spring semesters.

See the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Candidacy

Please see also information on “Enrolling in Classes” at https://coe.k-state.edu/grad/enroll.html

Dissertation (Proposal and Final Defense)

The dissertation is the culminating scholarly project of the doctorate. “A dissertation is required of all candidates for the award of a doctoral degree. Its purpose is to demonstrate the candidate’s ability to conduct significant original research of a type appropriate to the academic discipline, to analyze the information obtained from the research, and to present the results in a form acceptable to the supervisory committee. A dissertation must be written in a form appropriate to the discipline.”

See the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Dissertation

The process generally involves the following steps, depending on the design and research procedures:

1. Students work with their Major Professor (and often a methodologist) to complete their dissertation proposal, which usually consists of the first three chapters (in a traditional 5-chapter format). The student should work with his/her advisor to determine the format appropriate for the proposal meeting, depending on the proposed research design.

2. Students must complete CITI training prior to submitting protocol to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) if the study involves collecting data from human participants. See (http://www.k-state.edu/comply/irb/) for instructions on CITI training and the IRB Application Forms

3. IRB approval for the research study must be secured before data can be collected for the dissertation study. In preparation for the proposal meeting, the student should complete a draft of the IRB protocol (if planning to collect data from human participants). After the proposal meeting the IRB protocol should be finalized for submission.

4. The student works with the Major Professor to finalize the proposal and submit a copy to all committee members at least 10 days prior to the meeting. (If hard copies are needed, the student provides them to faculty).

5. The student works with the Major Professor to schedule the Proposal Meeting and a room through SECSA Staff. If the proposal is completed virtually via the Zoom platform, the link is provided to all committee members well ahead of time.

6. At the meeting, the role of each of the committee members should be clarified. Topics to discuss are: How the expertise of each committee member contributes to relevant chapters, how the methodologist will work with the student throughout the research process, and at what points the committee members should see drafts of the dissertation chapters.

7. Data collection may not begin until the proposal and the IRB protocol have been approved.

Additional links to K-State Graduate School processes and policies can be found here:

Requirements and Guidelines for Electronic Theses, Dissertations, and Reports are available at http://ou-dev.preview.web.k-state.edu/grad/etdr/create/guidelines.html

Final Examination, Defense of Dissertation: see the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Final%20Examination

SECTION 3. INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES AND INFORMATION (selected)

Please consult the Kansas State University website (especially the Graduate Handbook and the K-State Online website) for complete information on current policies. A few relevant topics are provided below:

Assistantships

For students who choose to live in Manhattan while completing the doctoral program, assistantships may be available. Interested students would need to apply for assistantships through the Human Capital Services website. Admission to the doctoral program does not include an assistantship offer; applying for the assistantship would be a separate process.

Course Retakes

Following is information from the Graduate School website:

“If a student received less than 3.0 in a course, the student may retake the course with approval of the major professor and the supervisory committee. If the course is retaken by the direction of the major professor and the supervisory committee, the original grade is noted as retaken and removed from the grade point average. The retake grade will always be used in computing the grade point average regardless of whether it is higher or lower than the original grade. A student may retake a course with subsequent removal of the prior grade only once for each course and for a total of two courses in the program of study. An approved program of study must be on file in the Graduate School at the time the retake request is submitted.”

The form “Request to Retake a Graduate Course” is available at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/academics/forms/ under “Doctoral Students.” Please note that retaking a course within the Leadership in Academic Advising program may delay the completion of the program.

Dismissal and Reinstatement

See http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Dismissal%20and%20Reinstatement

Grades and Grade Requirements

For information about grades and grade requirements (including Incompletes), see the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Grade%20Requirements

Graduate Student Rights and Grievance Procedures

Information about student rights and grievance procedures can be found in the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/appendixa.html

Inactive Status and Probation

See http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Inactive%20Status%20and%20Probation

Making Continual Progress

Once admitted, students are expected to make continual progress in taking courses and completing degree requirements. More information can be found at https://coe.k-state.edu/grad/enroll.html

Student Conduct and the Honor System

Student Conduct

The Student Code of Conduct is available at http://www.k-state.edu/student-involvement/code-of-conduct.html.

Honor System and Honor Pledge

All undergraduate and graduate students, including online students, are under the jurisdiction of the K-State Honor and Integrity System. The K-State Honor Pledge is “On my honor, as a student, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid on this academic work. The pledge applies to all assignments, examinations, and other course work.” For information on the Honor and Integrity System at K-State, go to http://www.k-state.edu/honor/.

Transfer of Credit

A. General conditions: Kansas State University accepts toward a doctoral degree graduate credit from another institution only under the following general conditions:

1. The other institution is accredited by the cognizant regional accrediting association to offer graduate degree programs appropriate to the level of the credit to be transferred;

2. The credit is fully acceptable to the other institution in satisfaction of its own advanced degree requirements; and

3. The credit is applicable to the student’s program of study for an advanced degree at Kansas State University.

B. Master’s degrees: Students who hold a master’s degree may request transfer of up to 30 hours of that degree toward a doctoral degree. The number of hours accepted depends on the relevance of the course work to a doctoral degree. Students with a master’s degree in an area different from that in which they intend to seek a doctoral degree may expect to transfer far fewer than the maximum 30 hours allowed.

C. Other credit: Students may also request to apply graduate credit earned at other accredited institutions toward a doctorate at Kansas State University under the following limitations:

1. Students who have not earned a master’s degree may ask to transfer up to 10 hours of master’s or doctoral-level work taken elsewhere. A graduate program may request additional credit be transferred for students in their doctoral program. Graduate programs granted such an exemption to the normal transfer limit, will present evidence of quality of the students’ programs of study during periodic program reviews.

2. Students who have transferred credit from a master’s degree (up to the maximum of 30 hours allowed) may normally ask to apply up to 10 more hours of transfer credit for doctoral-level work. These hours must represent credit earned beyond a master’s degree, even when the master’s program included more than 30 hours. A graduate program may request additional credit be transferred for students in their doctoral program. Graduate programs granted such an exemption to the normal transfer limit will present evidence of quality of the students’ programs of study during periodic program reviews.

3. Courses with the grade of C or lower are not acceptable for transfer unless they already form part of the candidate’s master’s degree received at another college or university.

4. Credits that were earned more than six years prior to the semester in which the program of study is approved cannot be transferred except as noted above.

SECTION 4. GENERAL INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

K-State Online Policies and Procedures

A number of helpful resources regarding the policies and procedures for Global Campus at KSU can be found at http://global.k-state.edu/students/policies/

Related Information – Student ID and Communication

Wildcat ID

The Wildcat ID (WID) is the student number assigned by the Graduate School upon admission to the University. This is a nine-digit number that always begins with an “8.” It will be listed on the top of the acceptance letter. Students should maintain this number for their records. It is required to complete the Program of Study document and other official forms. It can also be found on the eID profile page in the upper right-hand side of the page. The eID profile can be found by logging into http://eid.k-state.edu.

K-State eID

All students are required to have a K-State eID (eID is short for electronic identity). It is the name for a student’s central computer ID that serves as the primary electronic identity at K-State. The eID becomes the first part of the K-State email address (i.e., eID@ksu.edu).

To register for a K-State eID, go to http://eid.k-state.edu.

The eID is required to access many K-State resources:

The university’s student information system (KSIS)

Enroll for classes

Access eBill

View final grades

Use K-State email account

Access courses through Canvas

Download university licensed software

Students must remember their eID and password. Passwords must be changed twice per year. Students lose access to e-mail and other computing resources if they do not enroll, but they do not lose access to KSIS if they keep their password current. For more information about eIDs, go to http://www.k-state.edu/its/eid/faqs.html.

Email and Webmail

All email correspondence from K-State, including eBill information, will be sent to K-State email accounts. WebMail can be used to access K-State email accounts (see below), or many email programs can be set to check for additional email accounts including, K-State email. Most professors in the academic advising graduate program prefer students use K-State email accounts to avoid any problems with forwarding course documents to other email accounts, especially Hotmail.

For instructions on using K-State WebMail, go to http://www.k-state.edu/its/e-mail/.

Related Information – Enrollment in Courses

KSIS and Enrollment in Courses

Students enroll online using the interactive KSIS system. KSIS is Kansas State University’s student information system. The system manages the maintenance of student records, including enrolling in classes, accessing grades, and paying tuition. This interactive system is available at https://ksus.ksu.edu. KSIS can also be accessed directly from the K-State home page: http://www.k-state.edu/

For questions about KSIS, see https://www.k-state.edu/ksis/help/students/. Resources for specific help topics and Frequently Asked Questions are available. For help signing in to KSIS, contact the IT Help Desk at (785) 532-7722 or toll free 18008656143, or via email at helpdesk@ksu.edu.

The Course Schedule is available on the K-State web site at http://courses.k-state.edu/. This schedule provides a listing of all classes offered during the semester, a description of enrollment procedures, an academic calendar, and other useful information.

The Course Schedule will provide the class number, which is needed to enroll in the course through KSIS. Academic Advising courses can be found by clicking on the term one is registering for, then the College of Education, and then Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs. Courses are listed in numerical order and have the same numbers as presented in the course descriptions.

For information on “How to Enroll,” go to http://global.k-state.edu/students/enroll/howto/.

Viewing Final Course Grades

Final course grades are not sent via regular mail. Final grade reports may be viewed at KSIS (go to http://www.ksu.edu and click on “Sign In” in the upper righthand corner and select KSIS).

Library Services – Circulation Desk

Distance learners can get research help from librarians via e-mail, online chat, or by calling a toll-free number. K-State Libraries can also assist in obtaining books, journal articles, and other library materials. Students can access the Libraries’ online databases and electronic journal collections by using their eID and password. All materials in the Libraries are accessible to distance students through the Interlibrary Loan Service. Students can receive PDFs of articles and up to 50 pages of a book. Interlibrary Services will also mail books and other physical items that the Libraries own or borrow from other libraries. For more information regarding help for distance learners, see http://www.lib.k-state.edu/distance-learning.

Ask a Librarian – http://k-state.ask.libraryh3lp.com/ The graduate student contact at the K-State Library is Laura Bonella, Associate Professor.

Her contact information follows: Laura Bonella, Associate Professor 209 Hale (785) 532-2835  laurab@k-state.edu

For information on the range of services offered by K-State Libraries, go to http://www.lib.k-state.edu/services.

Textbooks

Students can access textbook and related course materials from links provided in KSIS and the K-State Course Schedule. Information provided includes the name of the book, author, ISBN number, and associated costs.

To find Textbook Information in KSIS or K-State Course Schedule, please visit the following website: http://www.k-state.edu/ksis/help/students/stuFindBookInfo.html

Some required textbooks and materials are available from NACADA. A NACADA Student Membership is $20. Members receive discounts on NACADA publications. The membership application form and a list of membership benefits are available at http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Member-Services/Become-a-Member.aspx

Technology in Courses

Most courses in the academic advising graduate program require use of technology and media. See http://global.k-state.edu/students/start/technology/ for information about technology resources and computer requirements for online courses.

The KState IT Help Desk is there to assist with questions regarding the technology used in courses. The IT Help Desk can be reached in the following ways:

Website: http://www.k-state.edu/its/helpdesk/
Email: helpdesk@kstate.edu
Phone: 7855327722 or toll free 18008656143

Related Information – Financial

Tuition and Fees

For information on Global Campus tuition and fees, go to http://global.k-state.edu/tuition-fees/

Paying Tuition and the K-State Cashier’s Office

An electronic bill (eBill) detailing tuition charges will be made available by the K‐State Cashier’s Office. An email with information about the eBill is sent to K‐State email addresses. The eBill can also be view by logging into KSIS, https://ksis.ksu.edu.

eBilling begins for each semester as follows: Fall – July 15th, Spring – December 15th, Summer – May 15th. The payment is due by the 14th of the next month. Any charges not paid on or before 4:00 p.m. on the due date will be subject to a 1.5% default charge. Please do not send payment or tuition assistance forms to the Cashier’s Office until receipt of the first statement. It is the student’s responsibility to drop courses. Classes will not be dropped for non‐payment. Not receiving a bill does not eliminate responsibility to pay. For questions regarding eBill or payment options contact the K-State Cashier’s Office:

Hours: M‐F, 8:00am – 5:00pm
Website: http://www.k-state.edu/finsvcs/cashiers/
Email: cashiers@k-state.edu
Phone: 785‐532‐6317

Course Drop/Refunds

For information on course drops and refunds, go to http://global.k-state.edu/students/policies/withdrawal/

Financial Aid

Financial aid is available through the Office of Student Financial Assistance. Following is the contact information for the K-State Office of Student Financial Assistance:                    104 Fairchild Hall 1601 Vattier Street Kansas State University Manhattan, KS 66506-1104

785-532-6420 phone
785-532-7628 fax
finaid@k-state.edu

For information on Financial Support for graduate students, go to http://www.k-state.edu/grad/financing/

Note that there are different applications for the fall and spring terms, and the summer term.

Scholarships

K-State Global Campus offers scholarships specifically for distance students earning their graduate degree online. Students must be enrolled in a minimum of three credit hours during the award semester. For information on scholarships, including the application form and frequently asked questions, offered through Global Campus, go to http://global.k-state.edu/students/scholarships/

Travel Grants

Grants for travel to professional events (e.g., conferences) are available through a variety of sources. Following are sources along with URLs or contacts for information on the travel grants:

K-State Graduate Student Council Travel Grants: http://www.k-state.edu/grad/students/studentcouncil/travel-grants/

K-State College of Education Travel Grants: https://www.coe.k-state.edu/grad/travel.html

Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs Travel Grants: For information, contact Ms. Cassy Llewelyn at cjwalker@ksu.edu.

SECTION 5. GLOBAL CAMPUS STUDENT SERVICES

Academic Resources

See http://global.k-state.edu/students/resources/academic/

Career Resources

See http://global.k-state.edu/students/resources/career/

Center for Advocacy, Response, and Education

The Center for Advocacy, Response, and Education provides 24-hour assistance for K-State students who have been victimized by violence. The staff can assist students in working with offices and agencies on and off campus who help students with law enforcement, legal, medical, and academic concerns. See https://www.k-state.edu/care/

Counseling Services for Distance Learners

Counseling Services at K-State hosts links to many online tools for distance students. See http://global.k-state.edu/students/resources/personal/

LGBT Resource Center

The LGBT Resource Center at Kansas State University is dedicated to helping the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) students, staff, and faculty and allied members of the KSU campus and surrounding communities to be more secure, educated, and productive in their personal and professional surroundings. See http://www.k-state.edu/lgbt/

Office of Student Life

The Office of Student Life offers services and resources that support, advise, and advocate for students. See http://www.k-state.edu/studentlife/

Non-Traditional and Veteran Student Services

See https://www.k-state.edu/nontrad/

Powercat Financial

Trained peer financial counselors can provide FREE information and education to currently enrolled K-State students about budgeting, credit use, student loan planning and repayment, saving, managing debt, transitioning to work after college, understanding job offers and employment benefits, and identity theft. A free, online, confidential financial counseling appointment may be scheduled. See http://www.k-state.edu/powercatfinancial/

Student Access Center

See http://www.k-state.edu/accesscenter/ for information regarding students with disabilities.

SECTION 6. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

NACADA: The Global Community for Academic Advising

NACADA: The Global Community for Academic Advising is the premier professional organization for academic advising and academic advisors. The vision and mission of NACADA follow:

Vision: Recognizing that effective academic advising is at the core of student success, NACADA aspires to be the premier global association for the development and dissemination of innovative theory, research, and practice of academic advising in higher education.

Mission: NACADA promotes student success by advancing the field of academic advising globally. We provide opportunities for professional development, networking, and leadership for our diverse membership.

Membership and involvement in NACADA are vital to your development as professionals. NACADA is a dynamic and active network of advising professionals (staff, faculty, and graduate students), made up of over 14,000 members from 42 countries. A member-driven organization, you will find opportunities for involvement that will advance your professional skills as leaders in higher education, contributing to the further development and documentation of the role of academic advising in student success. See http://www.nacada.ksu.edu

NACADA Center for Research at Kansas State University

The NACADA Center for Research at Kansas State University is the first global think tank dedicated to research in academic advising and student success and serves as a resource for advancing the scholarly practice and applied research related to academic advising. As you continue to approach academic advising from a scholarly lens, you will be directly involved with the broad and deep literature base that informs our work. Engagement in the Leadership in Academic Advising doctoral program is directly linked to the Scholarship of Advising, and you will have the opportunity to collaborate with your colleagues to present and publish your scholarly work. See www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Research-Center.aspx

APPENDIX A – Schedule of Courses

Year 1

Summer 2020 (Canvas, Zoom if designated, and On-campus sessions)

EDLEA 828 Scholarly Orientation to Graduate Studies (Session I, Synchronous Zoom

meetings weekly) – Enroll in Section ZA (11908)

EDCEP 930 Advanced Approaches to Academic Advising: Linking Theory, Research,

and Practice – (Cohort-only Class) – Enroll in Section ZA 12389

Fall 2020 (Canvas, Zoom if designated) – Major Professor and Supervisory Committee Selected

EDCEP 948 Advanced Student Development Theory

EDCEP 937 Administration of Academic Advising

Spring 2021 (Canvas, Zoom if designated)

EDCEP 927 Higher Education Administration

EDCEP 925 Higher Education Finance

Year 2

Summer 2021 (Canvas, Zoom if designated, and On-campus sessions)

EDCEP 817 Statistical Methods in Education

EDCEP 917 Experimental Design in Educational Research

Fall 2021 (Canvas, Zoom if designated)

EDCEP 926 Enrollment Management in Higher Education

EDLEA 838 Qualitative Research in Education (Synchronous Zoom meetings weekly)

Spring 2022 (Canvas, Zoom if designated)

EDCEP 923 Higher Education Law

EDLEA 988 Differentiated Research: Qualitative Methods (Synchronous Zoom meetings weekly)

Year 3

Summer 2022 (Canvas, Zoom if designated, and On-campus sessions)

EDCEP 934 Research in Academic Advising – (Cohort-only Class)

EDCEP 932 Ethical Issues and Practice in Academic Advising – (Cohort-only Class)

Fall 2022

EDCEP 999 Preliminary Examination (6 hours)

Spring 2023

EDCEP 999 Dissertation Proposal and IRB Protocol Submission (6 hours)

Year 4

A minimum of 6 hours of EDCEP 999 needed to reach 18 required hours. Additional hours will be needed if dissertation research extends beyond enrollment in 18 hours of EDCEP 999.

Designated core courses may need to be taken concurrent with doctoral program courses.

APPENDIX B – Summer On-Campus Requirement

Full in-person attendance at a one-week, on-campus session is required of doctoral students in the cohort for the first three summers.

The sessions will be held on the Kansas State University campus in Manhattan, Kansas, and students will spend time in the NACADA Center for Research.

The summer on-campus sessions will involve a variety of activities, including coursework, professional development activities, research and creative activities, meetings with advisors, and other activities related to doctoral work.

Please note the dates below and make arrangements to travel to Manhattan, Kansas, for all meetings and class sessions.

Dates for mandatory in-person meetings for Leadership in Academic Advising Cohort 1 (please arrive by Sunday evening each year):

2020: July 13-17 (Monday at 9:00 am – Friday at Noon) – VIRTUAL MEETINGS VIA ZOOM

2021: July 12-16 (Monday at 9:00 am – Friday at Noon)

2022: July 11-15 (Monday at 9:00 am – Friday at Noon)

Travel and Lodging Information

All costs and arrangements for travel to and from Manhattan, Kansas, are the responsibility of the student.

Travel by air:

• Manhattan, KS (MHK): A shuttle for students flying in and out of the Manhattan Regional Airport (MHK) will be provided. See the airport website at http://www.flymhk.com/ for more information on available flights (all American Airlines).

• Kansas City International Airport (KCI): A greater number of flight options is available to Kansas City (KCI), but the airport is approximately 110 miles from Manhattan. It would be necessary to rent a car (perhaps with other cohort members). There are shuttle services available, but are usually quite expensive. See the airport website at https://www.flykci.com/ for more information.

Travel by car:

• Manhattan, KS, is located 1 hour west of Topeka, Kansas, and 2 hours west of Kansas City. See direction information on the K-State website at https://www.k-state.edu/directions/ and information about the City of Manhattan at https://cityofmhk.com/

• Temporary parking permits for the lot at the Unger Complex (home of the NACADA Center for Research and the NACADA Executive Office) are available for $5 per day. Arrangements should be made in advance. https://www.k-state.edu/parking/visitor.html

Lodging:

There are a number of reasonably priced hotels and Airbnbs.

K-State also offers inexpensive rates as part of their Guest Housing program for individuals coming to campus for academic purposes. See their website at: https://housing.k-state.edu/guest-housing/guest/index.html

Meals and Snacks

• Lunches and snacks during the day from Monday through Friday will be provided.

• A “welcome dinner” on Monday evening will be provided.

• All other meals and snacks (including during travel to and from Manhattan, KS, are the responsibility of the student. K-State Dining Services offers an individual meal option or a daily meal plan (if purchased in advance).

What to bring:

• Personal laptop and all course-related materials

• Comfortable clothing (within reason ) for summer weather in Manhattan, Kansas (indoor meeting rooms are often chilly, however)

• At least one institution-related shirt for “Spirit Day”

Location

Most meetings will held at the NACADA Center for Research at KSU. Parking permits are required for the lot. The address is:

2323 Anderson Ave., Suite 102J Manhattan, KS 66502

More information and assistance with planning will be available throughout the program.

 

APPENDIX C – Preliminary Examination Policy and Procedures

Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affaris

Ph.D. – Leadership in Academic Advising

(approved on 12/18/2019)

Purpose of the Preliminary Examination

The preliminary examination is intended to provide an opportunity for the student to demonstrate their breadth and depth of knowledge pertaining to Leadership in Academic Advising. It also serves to demonstrate the student’s ability to draw connections between theory, research, and practice.

Examination questions are individualized, developed by the major professor and the Supervisory Committee, and require each student to relate the concepts and skills learned in the curriculum to their particular area of interest in academic advising. This may encompass the broad area from which the student’s dissertation topic will be drawn, but work on the examination should not be confused with work on the dissertation itself. Elements of the preliminary examination will likely, however, be able to be used in the dissertation proposal, particularly in the review of related literature.

See the Graduate Handbook at http://www.k-state.edu/grad/graduate-handbook/chapter3.html#Preliminary%20Examination

Preliminary Exam Steps

Students are strongly encouraged to work closely with their Major Professor throughout their program of study. Within the second semester of coursework the Major Professor will be determined and the Program of Study will be finalized. During this semester the Supervisory Committee (faculty members who will serve on the preliminary exam committee and dissertation committee) will also be determined. Students should work with their major professor at least two semesters prior to the scheduled semester in which they will take the preliminary examination, especially during the summer, during which they will be enrolled in the Research in Academic Advising (EDCEP 934) course.

All exams must be reviewed and approved by the Supervisory Committee. Beginning the process early will ensure sufficient time for the review and approval of the examination by the Supervisory Committee well in advance of the student’s desired examination date.

The student works with the Major Professor and the Supervisory Committee to plan the examination using the following parameters:

1. The student prepares for the examination throughout the program of study by creating, maintaining, and updating bibliographies of key readings related to classes one takes and of reading related to one’s likely dissertation topic area. During the Research in Academic Advising course (EDCEP 934) this portfolio will be more specifically updated and reviewed.

2. The student and the Major Professor agree to the timing of the preliminary examination, which must be during the Fall semester immediately following successful completion of EDCEP 934 Research in Academic Advising. The “Request for Preliminary Examination Ballot” is to be submitted to the Graduate School one month in advance of the scheduled examination.

The student is permitted a full two weeks (including the first and last weekend) to complete the exam. For example, if the student chooses two weeks in September 2021, the student would receive the exam by email on Friday, September 10 and it would be due on Monday, September 27 by the end of the business day (central time).

The student should carefully consider their best time of the Fall, having consulted with supervisors and family, to be able to focus as much as possible on this very important, comprehensive essay.

3. Once the first draft of the preliminary exam has been constructed, and at least 3 weeks prior to the scheduled start of the exam, the members of the Supervisory Committee review the individualized questions, directing any objections or making any suggestions for change to the Major Professor directing the exam. The preliminary exam then will be sent to the student by the Major Professor.

4. The student writes the exam response during the designated time period.

5. The Supervisory Committee members evaluate the results, with the Major Professor coordinating the process. The Supervisory Committee will provide feedback (including recommendations regarding each section – pass or request of rewrites) within two weeks of receipt.

6. The Major Professor and Supervisory Committee will notify the student whether the preliminary exam has passed or if sections need to be rewritten. If sections are required to be rewritten, the student will receive the substantive feedback from the Supervisory Committee, designed to assist the student toward a successful rewrite.

7. In case of failure of the first preliminary examination, the Supervisory Committee may approve a second examination with no more than one dissenting vote. A second examination can be taken no sooner than three months following the initial failure. Once the supervisory committee and the student decide when the second examination is to be taken, the student should notify the Graduate School one month before the scheduled date. The composition of the supervisory committee shall not be changed before a final decision is reached on admission to candidacy. A second failure constitutes denial of admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree in the field of study of the graduate program. As with the first examination, the signed ballot must be returned to the Graduate School within one week of the determination of the results of the examination.

8. Once the preliminary examination is passed, the student moves to the dissertation stage.

Preliminary Exam Instructions and Expectations

The student will receive the exam via e-mail attachment from the Major Professor.

The student may consult and use any inanimate source or reference in the process of writing the doctoral exam, although the emphasis is to draw from reliable, scholarly sources.

The student should use the referencing style approved by the Supervisory Committee. The student is to complete all parts of the examination. Responses should be well written and well-conceptualized. The student will be expected to demonstrate command of relevant research and professional literature.

The following criteria will be used to assess the examination paper:

Writing: The paper should be well written, free of errors, logically arranged, and reflect the care that educational leaders should take when writing to other professionals or scholarly audiences.

Coverage: Examination responses should thoroughly address examination questions and demonstrate coverage without significant omissions or excesses.

Application of Scholarship: The student’s responses should reflect a thorough understanding of relevant key readings in the Leadership in Academic Advising doctoral curriculum as well as the readings related to the student’s broad area of interest. It is not enough to summarize key readings. Rather, the student should knowledgeably apply these readings in responses to the exam questions. The articulation of theory should be embedded and embodied in good practice, and supported not by opinion or experience, but by a good presentation of research with both primary and secondary sources.

Argumentation: Arguments made in the examination essay should be sound. That is: they should be grounded in appropriate scholarship; the claims should be supported by appropriate evidence; the premises used in the arguments should be accurate; and the links between premises and conclusions in the arguments made by the author should be explicit and clear in their logic.

Format and style: The paper should be formatted according to style guidelines selected by the Supervisory Committee. In-text and bibliographic references should follow these guidelines as well; one’s reader must always know when the source’s author is speaking and when the author is quoting or paraphrasing someone else/another source.

Suggestions for a successful preliminary exam:

• Work from an outline to develop a coherent line of reasoning for each answer, building in each case to a conclusion that is supported by the key ideas and evidence presented in the earlier sections. Construct appropriate headings and subheadings for the major topics and subtopics found in the question. Include key scholarly and professional literature in your discussion and analysis.

• Develop a conceptual framework that guides the author’s thinking and can be used as a critical lens for the argument/position.

NOTE: Sample preliminary exams will be provided and discussed during selected professional development sessions throughout the program

Ph.D. in Leadership in Academic Advising Student Handbook April 2020 – PDF document

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