Navigating the World of Student Loans

By Mary Lou Peter mlpeter@ksu.edu

Outstanding student loan debt was more than $800 billion in 2010, overtaking credit card and auto loan debt for the first time.

MANHATTAN, Kan. – So the acceptance letter came. You’re going to college and couldn’t be happier. For many, however, the excitement dims when the reality of paying for further education hits.

As state funding for higher education has dipped and tuition and fees have gone up, college students have increasingly turned to student loans to help pay for tuition, books and more. The good news is that such help is available, but understanding the long-term implications on a borrower’s overall financial picture is critical, according to Elizabeth Kiss, associate professor of family studies and human services at Kansas State University. Student loan debt can affect careers, home ownership and overall wealth years after the last college exam is taken.

“Approximately 40 percent of undergraduate students received federal student loans in 2013-2014,” said Kiss, who is a family resource management specialist with K-State Research and Extension. “Student loan debt, as a proportion of American’s debt, has increased over time. By 2013 it was 9 percent of the total debt of Americans, second only to mortgage debt.”

Kiss and colleagues at other land-grant universities collaborated to provide comprehensive information about student loans in one place. The Student Loan fact sheet series includes information on pre-borrowing, borrowing repayment considerations, and what to do if you run into challenges. The resources are on eXtension.org, an educational collaboration by land-grant universities aimed at providing information on a variety of topics.

An analysis of U.S. Department of Education data shows 30 percent of student loans in 2015 were either in deferment or forebearance, where borrowers have requested more time to pay them off or asked that the amount of the payment be temporarily reduced. In addition, 7 percent of student loans were in default.

Having student loan debt well into adulthood can hamper one’s ability to buy a home, save for retirement or start a business, Kiss said.

“Keep in mind that there are three broad ways to pay for education and training beyond high school scholarships and grants,” she said. “They are savings, work-study or a job, in addition to student loans. Most students will use all three.”

Critical moments in the decision-making process include evaluating post-high school options. Is a four-year school across the country the best choice? What about a community college 15 minutes from home? Public university or private college?

Would-be borrowers should understand what type of loan they are considering: private (commercial lenders or banks) or public (government) loans? Is the loan need based or non-need based? Borrowing and repayment options differ by the type of loan.

Know the long-term implications, Kiss said, including the repayment process, before signing loan documents.

More information is available at http://articles.extension.org/pages/72895/student-loans.

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K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans.  Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.

For more information:
Elizabeth Kiss – dekiss4@k-state.edu or 785-532-1946

Rich Robbins Writes Two Chapters of New Book On Advising

rich-robbinsA new book set to be released this month, by Jossey-Bass and NACADA: The Global Community for Academic Advising, provides academic advisors the insight they need to advance their understanding, practice, and leadership.

Dr. Rich Robbins, graduate faculty member in the Kansas State University Academic Advising Graduate Program, contributed two chapters to the book, Beyond Foundations: Developing as a Master Advisor. Robbins’ chapters are titled “Assessment of Academic Advising: Overview and Crafting Student Learning Outcomes” and “Assessment of Academic Advising: Gathering Outcome Evidence and Making Changes.” Written for experienced academic advisors, Beyond Foundations provides direction for primary-role and faculty academic advisors who seek not only to take their practice of advising to the next level, but also to widen their circle of influence.

Robbins worked with twenty-three authors, all leaders in the field, to provide insights into the important issues affecting the practice of academic advising. The result is a book that provides practical steps that contribute to advisors’ development including how to:

  • Use existing resources in new ways to master advising roles and promote student success
  • Apply theory to advance advising practice
  • Create and optimize professional development opportunities
  • Establish recognition for the contributions of academic advisors to the institution and higher education
  • Face challenges created by the changing higher education landscape

“In order to be an effective advisor in an ever-changing higher education environment, the learning never ends,” said Robbins, whose chapters address developing student learning outcomes for academic advising and assessment of academic advising. For additional information on Beyond Foundations: Developing as a Master Advisor, please visit: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/NACADA-Store.aspx

Evening Reception and Breakfast at NACADA Conference

The Kansas State University Academic Advising Graduate Program will host a evening reception* at the NACADA Conference in Atlanta:

Date: 10/6, Thursday
Time: 5:30-7:00 pm
Location: Marriott Marquis, suite #4703

Also, representatives of the faculty and Global Campus will be attending breakfast at the NACADA Conference on Friday, October 7, 2016. This will be on the 10th floor of the Mariott Marquis from 7:15 to 8:30 am.

This is a great opportunity to meet K-State faculty, fellow students and alumni. We hope to see you there!

*Breakfast and reception are for NACADA conference attendees only. Please be sure to bring your conference badge.

The NACADA Annual Conference will be held in Atlanta, GA October 5-8, 2016. This year’s theme is ATL: Advising to Learn. For more information regarding the conference, please visit the NACADA website: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Events-Programs/Events/Annual-Conference.aspx

Global Campus Scholarships Awarded for Fall

Academic advising graduate students receive Fall 2016 scholarships from Global Campus and the College of Education to pursue their degrees. Congratulations!

College of Education Scholarship for Distance Education Students
Carina de Armas, master’s student in academic advising
Kaylee Head, master’s student in academic advising
Ana Sanchez, master’s student in academic advising

Global Campus Scholarship for Distance Education Students
Natasha Brenchley, master’s student in academic advising

Distance students pursuing an undergraduate or graduate degree offered through K-State Global Campus can apply for scholarships for upcoming semesters. View available scholarships at global.k-state.edu/students/services/scholarships. The deadline for spring and summer scholarships is November 2, 2016. The application will be available in September.

Course Schedule for Summer 2017 Announced

The following courses will be offered Summer 2017:

EDCEP 816 Research Methods
EDCEP 829 Learning Principles
EDCEP 835 Foundations of Academic Advising
EDCEP 836 Interpersonal Relations for Academic Advising
EDCEP 838 Student Development Theory
EDCEP 854 College Student Athletes
EDCEP 863 Trends in Career Development
EDCEP 864 Current Issues in Intercollegiate Athletics
EDSP 853 College Students with Special Needs

Enrollment for summer semester runs from March 27 2017 –  May 19, 2017

Course Drop Dates

For Regular Session courses, the following drop/refund dates apply:

  • September 12, 2016 – Last day for 100% refund for a regular session course
  • September 19, 2016 – Last day for 50% refund for a regular session course
  • September 26, 2016 – Last day to drop a regular session course without a W being recorded
  • October 28, 2016 – Last day to drop a regular session course

If you are dropping your last (only) class, you will need to contact the Graduate School to withdraw for the semester. Scott Schlender <scottsch@ksu.edu> is the contact in the Graduate School.

College Placement Program for Two Kansas City Counties Unveiled at Recent Event

collegeadvising-sm

Mario Garcia III, a junior in family studies and human services and alumnus of Shawnee Mission North High School, speaks to audience members about being a first-generation college student at Kansas State University.Establishing a pathway for first-generation college students to enter a university was the focus of a recent launch event by Kansas State University Olathe and Shawnee Mission North High School.

 

Establishing a pathway for first-generation college students to enter a university was the focus of a recent launch event by Kansas State University Olathe and Shawnee Mission North High School.

The Aug. 23 event spotlighted the Kansas State College Advising Corps, a best fit college and university access program for low-income, underrepresented and first-generation college students in Johnson and Wyandotte counties. Six advisers with the corps help students navigate university enrollment and scholarship programs — processes that are often foreign to first-generation college students and families.

Faculty, administrators, recruiters, students and parents from the Olathe, Shawnee Mission and Turner School Districts, as well as the Shawnee Mission North High School Navy Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps and local media, turned out to listen to the speaker panel at Shawnee Mission North High School.

The speaker panel opened with Jim Hinson, superintendent for the Shawnee Mission School District. Hinson helped introduce a college advising corps program in Missouri, on which the Kansas system is modeled. The Kansas program is part of the national College Advising Corps.

Hinson was followed by Kansas State University speakers, including Gen. Richard Meyers, interim university president and an alumnus of Shawnee Mission High School; Pat Bosco, vice president for student life, dean of students and a first-generation college student; Mario Garcia III, a junior in family studies and human services, first-generation college student and alumnus of Shawnee Mission North High School; and Bernard Franklin, assistant vice president for student life, executive director of the Kansas State College Advising Corps and director of university programs for the Shawnee Mission School District.

“This program is simple,” Bosco said. “We’re interested in making sure that no one falls through the cracks, particularly first generation students. I was a first generation student in Syracuse, New York, and I went to a public school and fell through the cracks because I did not have an adviser and the support I needed to be successful. We’re not going to repeat that for these students.”

The program, which recently began its pilot year, will benefit more than 10,000 students currently enrolled in Olathe East and North high schools; Shawnee Mission North, South and West high schools; and Turner High School. These schools have a significant population of students who quality for free and reduced lunch or are forecasted to have a significant ethnic and income shift in the coming years.

The U.S. Census Bureau projects a significant shift in the nation’s demographics by 2050, at which time black, Hispanic and Asian populations will comprise half of the U.S. population while the number of white households will decrease.

As this population increases, college access rates for low-income and underrepresented students needs to increase as well, Gen. Meyers said. Historically, individuals in these demographics are often the first generation to go to college in their family and are unfamiliar with navigating the complex higher education enrollment and scholarship processes.

Educating this growing population also presents opportunities for the workforce in greater Kansas City. The Mid-American Regional Council states that 34 percent of adults older than age 25 in the greater Kansas City region have at least a bachelor’s degree. In the last 10 years, however, 40 percent of new jobs created in the Kansas City region required a bachelor’s degree.

“If the region is going to grow, then education and talent are important,” Gen. Meyers said. “The workforce needs of greater Kansas City tie directly into this program and underscore why Kansas State University, a land-grant university, is involved in providing increased access to higher education for Kansas students and ensuring the region’s continued growth and success.”

The program is funded by Kauffman Foundation, AmeriCorps, the National Academic Advising Association, the College Advising Corps, Kansas State University and the Shawnee Mission School District.

For more information about the Kansas State College Advising Corps, visit k-state.edu/kscac.

NACADA Conference Breakfast*, October 7

Representatives of the faculty and Global Campus will be attending breakfast at the NACADA Conference on Friday, October 7, 2016. This will be on the 10th floor of the Mariott Marquis from 7:15 to 8:30 am.

The Kansas State University Academic Advising Graduate Program will host a evening reception* at the NACADA Conference in Atlanta:

Date: 10/6, Thursday
Time: 5:30-7:00 pm
Location: Marriott Marquis, suite #4703

This is a great opportunity to meet K-State faculty, fellow students and alumni. We hope to see you there!

*Breakfast and reception are for NACADA conference attendees only. Please be sure to bring your conference badge.

The NACADA Annual Conference will be held in Atlanta, GA October 5-8, 2016. This year’s theme is ATL: Advising to Learn. For more information regarding the conference, please visit the NACADA website: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Events-Programs/Events/Annual-Conference.aspx

Fall 2016 Course Drop Dates

Course Drop Deadline Dates

Course drop dates are calculated by counting calendar days, including Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. When the drop deadline falls on a weekend or holiday, the deadline will be moved to the next business day.

For Regular Session courses, the following drop/refund dates apply:

  • September 12, 2016 – Last day for 100% refund for a regular session course
  • September 19, 2016 – Last day for 50% refund for a regular session course
  • September 26, 2016 – Last day to drop a regular session course without a W being recorded
  • October 28, 2016 – Last day to drop a regular session course

If you are dropping your last (only) class, you will need to contact the Graduate School to withdraw for the semester. Scott Schlender <scottsch@ksu.edu> is the contact in the Graduate School.

NACADA Offers Internship Connection Service

What is the Internship Connection Service?

The NACADA Internship Connection Service (ICS) provides assistance to:

  • graduate students seeking educational and/or research opportunities outside of their current master’s or doctoral program.
  • higher education offices and programs seeking to benefit from the initiative, enthusiasm, and diverse perspectives of students from outside their institution.

The NACADA ICS provides incoming and current graduate students opportunities to connect with higher education institutions offering internships related to the field of Academic Advising. The purpose of the ICS is to enhance the learning experience opportunities for students, while offering mentoring opportunities for current advising professionals.

Goals of the ICS include showcasing educational opportunities, encouraging research, and promoting the development of effective academic advising practices. Internships create opportunities for graduate students to have hands-on advising-related experience that they may not receive within their graduate program and allow both developing professionals and current advising professionals opportunities to explore and diversify their advising styles and expertise.

Please be aware that the ICS serves solely as a bridge to facilitate connections between institutions and students; NACADA makes no guarantees of placement or accommodations.

This is a service for NACADA Members only. Student memberships ($20) are available to students that are not already working full time in the field of academic advising. http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Member-Services/Become-a-Member.aspx

For more information about the program, please visit: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Internship-Connection-Service.aspx or contact Leigh Cunningham (Leigh@ksu.edu)

The NACADA Internship Connection is not part of the Kansas State University Academic Advising Graduate Program and students cannot receive academic credit through Kansas State University.